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, entertainment industry, but a and the civil-rights movement conspired to put a transparent the innocent man in prison -- present for the rest of his life. i had to ask myself why? and what i have chosen to do is to ask for basic questions why did this happen in? the second question is how transparent was george zimmerman innocent? how did these forces succeed to bring zimmerman to a trial and get him arrested? and fourth, what was the consequence of trying an innocent man and a county where he could expect a fair trial? let me start with the wise and i have to go back to the year 1920. the rest of to an italian-american gentleman arrested for the murder of a payroll clerk also an italian-american. they went to trial 1921 he was sentenced 15 years in prison nobody said anything about it that later they went to trial and had an interpreter and due process and went through the trial both were convicted in both transparently guilty. and in 19211 of the reporters the guys in this case throwback to his editor and said not much here. just a couple of logs in the jam then the aclu picks up the case
to draw profound parallels between our civil rights movement and what they experienced in south africa years ago. >> caller: of course, there's a common thread that is overlooked. gandy went to india. he began movements to south africa. dr. king oftentimes cited ghandi as his exemplary so did mandela. when you speak of the american movement and south africa, there's a common theme. so, there is an intellectual, spiritual relationship. clearly, the movement in south africa was one in which all of the resources of the state were placed against mr. mandela and his movement. in this country, we had our own challenges, of course, coming out of slavery. our civil war, there were places of refuge. during the civil war, there were places of refuge in this country, there were none in south africa. many had to flee and go elsewhere. mr. mandela chose not to flee and go elsewhere. he spent 27 years in prison. >> interestingly, too, martin luther king made an impact while living, but one could argue he's made a greater impact since he has been gone. nelson mandela made the impact while he was stil
mandela. how the son of another civil rights icon is help remembering a man who helped end apartheid. 'y and gifts store. anything we purchase for the paper cottage goes on our ink card. so you can manage your business expenses and access them online instantly with the game changing app from ink. we didn't get into business to spend time managing receipts, that's why we have ink. we like being in business because we like being creative, we like interacting with people. so you have time to focus on the things you love. ink from chase. so you can. [ mthat if you wear a partial,w you're almost twice as likely to lose your supporting teeth? try poligrip for partials. poligrip helps minimize stress which may damage supporting teeth by stabilizing your partial. care for your partial. help protect your natural teeth. >>> former presidents george w. bush and bill clinton will join president obama at a memorial for nelson mandela next week as south africa mourns its former president's death. crowds outside his johannesburg home are singing their tributes. ♪ hundreds of people of all ages and co
civil rights movement and then he was on the side of civil rights and then it got all complicated with affirmative action and bussing and sanctions he said made it all clear again. he stood up again against the president. i was covering the white house then and occasionally they would bring in small groups of reporters to chat with the president on the theor theory w each other. it was during this period the president said more black people drive and own cars in south africa than there are cars in the soviet union and to him that sort of rationalized, this was, you know, communism is the evil system. and you had po to do everything to stand up to communism. i remember clearly he reached for two cookies and said he had half a sandwich for lunch. pat buchanon was a speech writer in the white house then. i recalled this memory to him. he said he wrote that lean. he got it from commentary magazine. he said reagan loved it but the secretary of state george schultz was furious at him for putting it in. it made if president look like simpleton. >> but that was a part, anything that could
international media showing you how nelson mandela touched lives for civil rights around the world. fellow south africans, you know, nelson mandela brought them together as well. he had been in and out of the hospital for months. in june, he was admitted to a facility for a lung infection. we'll be here all evening long. people are coming here. in fact, a man, moments ago, dropped off flowers here. he just stood. he didn't say anything. he stood, looked at the statue and calmly walked away. live here on massachusetts avenue, outside the south african embassy, i'm shomari stone, news 4. >> thank you. >> we heard the little girl mention his family. he is survived by a wife, three of his children and a couple dozen grandchildren and great grandchildren. >> they were by his bedside late this afternoon. >> we have been seeing the live pictures of nelson mandela's statue this evening. tom sherwood was there when the statue was unveiled this past september. it's a shame to see the fence and the barbed wire. >> i hope it will move some of the reconstruction, the embassy is being rebuilt. if they could m
they were supposed to do. and still, yet, they get arrested. >> under federal civil right laws there have been cases in the second circuit that have gone a lot further. if i was a law enforcer, i would think about dismissing charges. >> today, the monroe county district attorney said in a statement after reviewing the facts associated with these arrests, i have decided to dismiss the charges in the interest of justice. joining me now is james peterson, associate professor of english at lehigh university. also an msnbc contributor. this looked like the outcome that had to happen, after our program last night, the mayor of rochester came out against this. i was deliberately on this show last night doing everything i could, including booking dan french, to push this prosecutor back and to push the police back on this arrest. >> that's right, and listen, kudos to you, your show, and your producers for making this national news. we have to give credit where it's due. really important here, lawrence. i'm teaching a class right now in black prison narrative. i'm studying michelle alexander and t
. it started with jesse helms. i rest my case. >> and strom thurmond. >> because after the civil rights act of 1964 was passed, they were very irate that the democratic party was becoming inclusive in all kinds of ways, especially racial. they started to -- 8000 fundamentalist baptist churches -- they took over the republican party levers of power gradually, so now you cannot get through the primaries to get into the general election as a smart, centrist conservative whatever, a perfectly sensible person. it is so dangerous to have one of our two parties controlled by extremists. of course, we get mad at the democrats. i am mad at the democrats every minute. then you find yourself voting for this other party. here's my plan. my plan is that we do what the right-wing democrats did and we go to the local caucuses and so on. even i am willing to look republican. i will take off this belt. [laughter] [applause] >> do you like my jacket? >> yes. we will infiltrate the caucuses. that is what they did. we will take them over. in four years, you will have a chaotic and terrible republican conventio
with luis. she also became very interested in civil rights. we have a problem at that time was a white supremacist group in town, and she held a group of people lobby to get a unanimous vote in the legislature for a law allowing civil damages for civil harassment. that brought an end to that white supremacist compound that gave coeur d'alene a pretty bad name sometimes. she didn't want anyone to be known for that. at one point people and urged her to for governor, and share the name recognition. she had the people behind or. she had a lot of the things that any of the politicians would want, and she knew it. but she didn't. she chose not to. for several reasons, and i talk about them in the book but i think the biggest, she was not one to say her own name over and over. she preferred to work behind the scenes. and became one of those people that worked in the senator's office, and the congressman's office, the governor's office, to get things done outside the political fight. i came here 20 years ago to be the pastor of her church. i count in the book some interesting little stories. o
for mobile justice and civil rights work. there is so much more here. he was an adviser to secretary of state condoleezza rice. when i first met him, the council of the department of state he's a member of the president's intelligence advisory board and he was for president bush and president obama and he has written a number of books. germany unified. statecraft is a good one. he wrote that with condoleezza rice and most importantly he is a member of the aspen strategy group that he directed from 2,000 to 2003. i will sort by asking michele and fill up a few questions and then i will open up to the audience. we are in a transitional period for american defense strategy. are there lessons? thathat is a build down from lat summer of the pentagon. are there lessons in earlier periods in history that can help guide us now? >> what don't you answer that question. >> good afternoon everyone. it's wonderful to see so many familiar faces around the table. i do think there are some lessons to be learned from our history in terms of periods like this where we are coming out of a period of war and we a
the modern mother of the civil rights movement, rosa parks. this past sunday, we celebrated the 58th anniversary of rosa parks refusing to give up her seat on that bus in montgomery, alabama. i am so proud to stand here from the great state of ohio because it was the great state of ohio that was the first state in this nation to name december 1 rosa parks day. on thursday and friday of this week in our district, we will bring people from all over the state to pay tribute to her. and we will bring in more than 600 little children who will learn about civil rights and understand the value of working together. the last day, 1955, she started something larger than herself. she stood -- she sat down so we could stand up. mr. speaker, it is my honor to be a part of the legislation that created december 1 in ohio as rosa parks day. thank you and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back. for what purpose does the gentleman from pennsylvania seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speake
-- >> and credit. >> right. >> looking at some of the figures who were known to people as established players, when the revolution finished as well as when the civil war was completed, george washington, for example, 1775, seemed to be somewhat of an out lie -- out-ly 'er. >> when i came up with the book, my concern was, washington, the walking marble man, and what us he going to really be a buzz kill once he arrives on the scene after the battle of bunker hill. anything but. i mean, it's just fascinating to see washington. a man from virginia, arriving in new england. a couple weeks after the battle of bunker hill -- and this is a new england army. these are people whose idea of diversity is, okay, i'm from massachusetts but i'm willing to serve in an army with someone from new hampshire. and then to have this plantation owner arrive, and he realizes, this is an army that, because they have grown up with the new england town meeting -- which is a wonderful form of government in which basically people argue until finally they come to a decision. the soldiers in this army, when given an order, would
of guerrilla leaders in civil wars anywhere who just hate the opposition, right? you see that in syria today but he managed not to let that pull him down but to just focus on changing the system and not hating the people. jon: tom carver covered the end of apartheid in south africa for the bcc. he talked to nelson mandela a couple of types. tom, thank you for sharing those thoughts. >> you're welcome. >> some new details emerging from the investigation into the tragic death of paul walker. police now making an arrest in what they say that these two men stole from the scene of the crash and how they found out about it. we'll get you up-to-date on that. >>> also the white house says the obamacare website now works for most americans. why problems with the site can lead to a nasty surprise for some people who think they signed up for insurance. every day we're working to be an even better company - and to keep our commitments. and we've made a big commitment to america. bp supports nearly 250,000 jobs here. througall of our energy operations, we invest more in the u.s. than any other place in t
. >>> the senate judiciary committee chairman patrick leahy will deliver a speech on thursday on civil liberty, national security, and human rights. you can see the remarks live at 1:15 eastern on c-span2. >>> as you walk in, there are tables in front with a bunch of pamphlets. prior to entering the gun show. about how the government is trying to take away the guns and obama is doing this and obamacare is terrible. and so those are the guys i wanted to talk to. they were quites with the leaflet. the ideas. so i said to them, like, is this your stuff? and yeah, who are you? i'm academic. i'm a researcher and i'm doing a research on these organizations. these ideas trying to understand the guys. and i study men who believe this stuff. and they looked at me suspiciously and asked me question. and i said, look, here is what i am. i don't get it. so what here is my job. i want to understand how you see the world. i want to understand your world view. it is -- look, you will not convince me. ly not convince you. that's off the table. what is on the table i want to understand why you think the way yo
human rights first. he'll talk about balancing national security and civil liberties. that starts at 1:15 eastern here on c-span2. >> i didn't get the idea for the dummies series. i had an idea to do a beginning book about computers, about it specifically. i kind of inspired myself to do that u just daling with people in the magazine editing job i had had. being on the radio at that time. and being out in the public and talking to people about computers. it was obviously that people wanted to learn more but that the material we had available at the time just wasn't doing the job. we had beginner box on how to use computers. but they sucked. they just didn't have that, you know, they were condescending. they were pate nice. the author was arrogant. well, you'll never get the stuff anyway or iowa, look, this is cool. people didn't want to know that. they wanted to use a computer. they planned to publish one book, and even then there was some reluctancy with the title when the owner found out they had this book. he's like you can't offend the reader. cancel that book. and unfortunately, w
finding the right way. we're a little colony on the outskirts of western civilization, and we produce in the 18th century the greatest generation of political geniuses ever assembled on earth to produce a constitution that has given us a republic that has endured longer than any in the history of man kind. mankind. in the 19th century, we are a country that needs a lincoln, and a lincoln arises. in the '20s during the depression and to lead us in the second world war, we find be our fdr. and in the second half, we find our reagan. this is not to say that we will always be able to find our way. but there is something about the american spirit, about the bedrock decency and common sense of the american that seems to help us find our way, and we do. and if that isn't enough to cheer you up, i will leave you with a remark, a comment of my favorite pundit, ott to von -- otto von business mark, not generally known for punditry. [laughter] generally known for invading other countries. [laughter] successfully. [laughter] who once actually said god looks after children, fools, drunkards and th
kinds of things. we fought a civil war over this once before, you know, and i just don't think it is right. who --tion would be -- president obama when he severed -- when hed look for sat for 20 years and listen to reverend wright? guest: you know, i'm not quite sure how to answer that question. that there is a lot of variation between the states and the federal systems, and that is really one of the things that we found was that there is so much of a difference between a federal standards and the states, and the states really have so much variation between them. some of them -- the rules are state, soto the you have the separation of powers, you have the state rights. they would have a really unique form and unique standards. i could give examples of your interested. host: sure. guest: in new jersey, they asked the justices to discuss if they own any property in atlantic city. atlantic city geographically the tiny part of new jersey. i guess this came from interest in making sure there were not corruptive influences and gambling. in north carolina, they asked for any -- if any
or throat, or difficulty breathing or swallowing, stop taking cialis and get medical help right away. ask your doctor about cialis for daily use and a 30-tablet free trial. >> health care manufacturer johnson & johnson will pay to sell civil allegations. >> i expect this from you, johnson, but not you, johnson. to be honest, i have not trusted johnson & johnson since i tried to stop my child's crying with the no more tears shampoo in his eyes. did not work. >> the 113th hasn't passed the bills every congress does like a highway bill or defense bill or farm bill or a budget. what do we need a budget for? clearly not for highways, defense, or food. congress did pass a bill ensuring that people can fish near dams on the cumberland river and also passed deep cuts in food stamps if are the poor which is good solid governing because the poor don't need food stamps anymore now that they can fish near dams on the coupler withland river. >> time to talk about what we learned. we learned a lot. i learned you can catch a munch kin in your mouth if it is delivered right. >> it's not good. really bad
and in the case of boys, toxic in some ways. so i do believe that children need to be civilized, we have to open our hearts and minds and teach them to be caring and considerate human beings, but that does not mean that forcing boys to be exactly like girls is right, it doesn't mean being girls as if they are failing ophelia's at and for the most part, and this is a radical thing to say, most of them are quite healthy. and including most boys. we have to preserve a distinction, which is why sociologists have to do speed have a distinction between healthy masculinity. a young man that displays pathological masculinity, he shows his manhood by being destructive and tearing things apart, just basically -- a reign of terror. and the boy that has been healthy is the opposite. he is the opposite and he builds and he doesn't prey upon people he protects. and i still believe that that is the majority of men that i have known, and if i look at the data, the majority of men in the united states, they are -- they have been displaying healthy masculinity. the boys playing cops and robbers, it's terrible to
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)